Walking

My children dislike walking. Or so they tell me. It’s not that they’d rather be sitting. Far from it. In fact my eldest struggles to maintain a seated position whilst eating his dinner. With each mouthful, he’ll slowly raise himself higher in the chair, subtlety passing through the hovering stage, until you suddenly become aware that he is now standing – chair neglected and abandoned beside him. Neither can you say that they don’t like to walk because it requires too much physical exertion. Maybe this might apply to myself or their Grandmother – but for them, running is preferable to walking. I’m fairly sure when they were tiny they went straight from crawling to running (maybe taking the odd step or two somewhere in the middle).

Trying to walk even a short distance with them can be catastrophic if I refer to it as ‘walking’. They start by dragging their feet, then begin sitting down on the pavement every two metres or so (because they’ve run out of breath apparently). Sometimes they even deem it necessary to cling to the back of my coat and stop moving their feet, in the hope that mummy will use her ‘levitation’ superpower to get the big ones up the hill without actually lifting them, whilst simultaneously pushing youngest son in his pram. By the end of the walk, their method of moving forwards can only be described as resembling something out of Monty Python’s ministry of silly walks. Therefore, if we need to go for a short walk to actually get somewhere (especially if we have a certain time at which we need to arrive) we can usually be found complete with transport. Their reliance on the scooters has decreased slightly now they can ride their bikes. If wheels are not a viable option, there are a number of tactics I use to get them on the move. Here are my top five:

1) Walking along a wall or painted line on the pavement.

2) Collecting something along the way – usually daisies or some other form of interesting looking weed.

3) Turning it into a race against Mummy. Somehow Mummy always seems to lose.

4) Counting lampposts or orange things between the start point and the destination.

5) Who can be first to spot the….? Choose an object that isn’t actually there to maximise distance covered.

This is why if we’re going for a longer walk I usually use the term ‘adventure’ or ‘exploration’. I remember a time before the arrival (or invention) of youngest son when they walked over three kilometres (at the ages of 2 and 4), armed only with a selection of croissants to refuel. We were going all morning, past sheep, over stiles, along hilly paths, and through woods. They loved it. Not sure what exactly they thought they were doing – maybe the term ‘walking’ only applies if you’re on a pavement.

Crowded places

Another interesting rule I’ve discovered, which applies to my children, is that the amount they play up in public places is directly proportional to how crowded a location is. Take them to a lovely, secluded place and they are amazing. However in amongst a packed audience, within a relatively quiet room and my bigger two boys rival race cars – both with the speed at which they run and the Diesel engine type noises they make whilst doing so.

My timing for school pick up was not great last Friday. The ‘grown up kids’ junior school (next to eldest boy’s school) finishes exactly 5 minutes later. Eldest boy was last to come out and then proceeded to greet youngest boy with a high pitched squeal that I’m pretty sure could only be detected by bat sonar, unless you happened to be stood right beside it – which unfortunately I was. What I’ve neglected to mention, is that when your primary concern is to entertain your baby brother with howling noises, you fail to notice your book bag is trailing through an unfortunately positioned puddle. So by the time I’d rescued aforementioned book bag and made it across the playground, it was approximately 4 mins and 58 seconds later.

We reached the other school just as the doors opened and a swarm of children came flooding out. We had a line of parents on our right, incoming children on the left and families eager to make a quick getaway behind us. It was at this point I became aware that middle boy had stopped walking and was attaching himself to my right leg. I had no idea why and limited time to extract any form of complex reasoning from him on the subject. I took his hand and coaxed him onward. I was fully conscious that if I played the the wrong move here, our little family was likely to be solely responsible for causing traffic tailbacks longer than those found on the M27 at rush hour. We successfully moved forward about 5 foot before he attempted a similar manoeuvre, losing his footing and falling as he did so. I helped him up but we were going nowhere, the crowd seemed to be getting larger, the queue of people waiting to pass us seemed to be getting longer and eldest son seemed to be disappearing further into the distance. It was at this point that a lady I’d never spoken to before, until that point known only as ‘the lady with the long orange coat’, intervened and offered to push youngest son in his pram for me so I could carry middle son. For this, I am very grateful to her. A few seconds later, eldest son reappeared pushing his brother’s scooter for him. On sight of it, middle child seemed completely rejuvenated and was now capable of walking on his own again. Crisis averted with the help of a kind stranger.

Of course, I was then faced with the difficulty of continuing to walk the same direction as this helpful lady for the next two corners – at a ridiculously slow speed – unable to ask to pass her. This was partially as I felt I was now forever in her debt and saying “Excuse me” as well would be asking far too much. Primarily though, if we had gone on ahead, I would have felt like I needed to sustain ‘overtaking speed’ and I couldn’t handle the embarrassment if my boys decided to randomly stop again.

The time phenomenon

There should be 24 hours in a day. There are 24 hours in a day. Sometimes it doesn’t feel like it. Exciting days can go quickly, dull days can go slowly, but its safe to say the 24 hours rule is reliable. Then children come along and suddenly you have a grand total of 10 minutes for sleeping, eating, entertaining the small people and everything else the day throws at you. The exception to this rule is of course when you are playing your ‘least favourite’ and your offspring’s ‘best ever’ board game. In these instances, you are playing for a minimum of 10 hours.

This morning my alarm clock (affectionately known as youngest son) went off later than usual. I woke up covered in an assortment of snot and sneezes – from night feedings – and quickly established I was already 1/2 hour behind schedule. Middle son appeared soon after but eldest boy was still asleep. I decided that leaving him to sleep for a bit longer wouldn’t do any harm. This meant that I currently only had two little humans depending on me, if only for a brief period of time. Besides middle son was being elusive so I suspected he may have had a bedtime wee accident. It’s not always a good thing when you find out you are right.

By the time we made it downstairs for breakfast we were 45 minutes behind schedule. It was as this point that I made a fatal error: sharing this piece of information with my children. Knowing that we were later than usual, resulted in them being instantly ‘helpful’. I was presented with an assortment of bowls and told, “These are for you Mummy” – perhaps I should have mentioned I had every intention of skipping my own breakfast until after the school run! I asked eldest son which out of the motley collection of crockery in front of me was for him and was told that he hadn’t got his out yet. Meanwhile middle son was laying the table with enough spoons to feed a small army, again forgetting that vitally important item: his own spoon!

Next they needed to choose their cereals. Again they were keen to assist in doing this job quickly. So we only had the short rendition of ‘Eeny meeny miney mo’ with which to select the first cereal. It was at this point that I made my second error: trying to suggest that they only had one cereal each. Not only did this fail, but it resulted in my sons reciting back to me ‘my own’ breakfast rules from breakfasts past, before a decision could be made about cereal number 2 and 3. I tried getting them to sit down while I poured the milk, because I had a wriggly baby in the other arm and spillages are already 92% more likely to occur when you are rushing. So I naively thought that if the big two were out of the breakfast preparation vicinity it might improve my odds marginally. I was convinced we were about 5 hours behind by this point and may arrive at school just in time to pick them up. Any decision I made at this point was a gamble.

On this occasion it worked! No further delays. Littlest had a perfectly timed speed feed, dropping his latch at the exact same time that eldest asked to leave the table. The pushchair was already in the house from the previous night (a totally different sleep related story), so baby could lie in there, ready to go, and giving my left arm a well deserved break. This meant I could stealthily put middle son’s shoes on while he had his last few mouthfuls. Then he went to put his coat on – not something he normally volunteers to do without first discussing the meaning of life. I got the lunchbox out of the fridge to put under the pushchair, only to discover eldest son, who had got himself ready to walk out of the door, was gently rocking the pushchair. “Baby was crying so I was looking after him.” he said. Not only did we make up the time, but I had a little moment to appreciate how loving my boys are before starting the sprint to school. #lovemyboys

Disclaimer: I can confirm that we arrived at school on time 🙂 parenting win!

Communication methods

Middle son is more than capable of using words to tell me something. However, in addition to English he is also fluent in a second language. I’m yet to establish a name for it, but it basically involves obstructing Mummy in some way. This morning he strolled into my room. I asked him “How was your night?” and he responded by lying down on the floor in front of me.

This occurs frequently. Similar happened as we were coming through the front door yesterday. I requested that he took his shoes off and he promptly lay across the top step, demonstrating some kind of ‘planking’ move. He will vary it slightly depending what he wants to say. Sometimes there will be a leg in the air: other times he’ll position his arm at a peculiar angle – rivalling something from a zombie movie.

Of course there’s more to it than simply lying in front of me. For really urgent matters, he will elect to try and lie on me (preferably my feet). If I’m moving at the time, he decides the best course of action is to intercept my projected walking path. If I happen to be pushing littlest son in the pram when an vital matter occurs, then a rather complex manoeuvre is required. He stands on the wheel itself, allowing an abrupt stop to our journey and ensuring he has my full attention. It is at this point that he is able to share that important information with the whole family, that information he was so concerned we might miss if he’d just mentioned it casually in conversation. For those reading also keen to find out the message on this occasion: there was a grass on shoe.

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Mud and breakages

Why is it that when your children are screaming at you, there’s always a large audience? Often, for me, this is in the supermarket. On this occasion, it was the school playground.

In my last post, I mentioned having a moment. This particular moment occurred while I’d half changed a cold, wet, muddy and wriggling three-year-old; only to discover that the one item not packed in his changing bag (a pair of trousers) was the one essential item he needed. Then another mummy helpfully mentioned “That water bottle’s leaking all over your bags!”. She was right. It was.
The day had started out pretty well and by that I mean the children had all been fed and were out of the house with enough time to run an errand on the way to school. We arrived at school without incident. Middle boy falls over. I pick him up and there are no tears. I stroll over to another mother, I feel confident enough to make conversation. Eldest boy appears “He’s about to fall over again.”
I asked my son how he knew this and was told that it was because his brother was climbing on a muddy bank. Evidently my boy has a talent for predicting future events – as I turned, middle boy slipped and was now wearing the muddy bank. It would have been too easy to wait for 5 minutes until his preschool opened and change him there. So I attempted to remove his soaking coat and change his trousers while still in the playground. It was a wet day so I couldn’t just sit him on my lap to do it, and it was cold so I was trying to change him quickly. The discovery that his spare, clean trousers had been forgotten occurred while middle child’s legs were still dangling in mid air. I thought it was a genius plan using eldest child’s school trousers instead – after all they were only slightly too long. Disaster adverted I thought.
That’s when I was told about the leaking water bottle.

I picked it up. The lid was still on tightly, but the growing puddle in the bottom of the pram would suggest a leak from somewhere. That somewhere, it turned out, was a whopping great big crack in the base of the bottle (no idea how I managed to miss it earlier). Middle boys book bag was the worst hit – thankfully it was empty. Again feeling like I’d dodged a bullet, I went to put the (now useless) water bottle in the bin. Eldest boy howls and I mean howls. Floods of real tears appear, “Don’t put it in the bin!”. He begged me. Then middle child starts, “I’m thirsty”. I now have two crying boys trying to convince me that their Daddy can fix cracked, plastic, water holding receptacles. Eldest boy hasn’t been this opposed to me disposing of an object since his wee fragranced, old school shoes went in the skip last year.
After what felt like forever, his teacher eventually persuaded eldest boy to go into class meaning I only had the ‘explainwhymiddleboyisinadequatelydressed’ mission standing between me and the post 9am walk home.